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Wednesday, 28 November 2012

6 Resume Red Flags for the Modern Age

As we all know times are changing and the recruitment and candidate market place is changing with it. Candidates no longer submit hand-written, hard copy resumes; they don’t always interview face-to-face. No-one expects a job for life these days; candidates have a wealth of job search information resources available to them on the Internet and they can apply for jobs at the click of a button.

These changes to the recruiting and job seeking landscape are beginning to filter through to the resume short-listing process, which must adapt to suit the modern marketplace. For example, where once a candidate who changed jobs twice in a decade might have seemed unstable, in the modern age this might be the norm and could even constitute a long tenure. So, I thought it would be a good time to take stock five of the key resume red flags and update them to ensure they are in line with the modern age.

Published in Employee Screening

Increase your employee productivity immediately!

Published in HR Strategy & Tips
Tuesday, 25 June 2013

2013 Halfway Report

Are you flustered, flummoxed and flabbergasted that 2013 is already halfway over? Some updates moving forward for Workplace-laws-and-legal-issues-you-need-to-know

Published in Human Resources

Performance within groups typically does not just happen.

For a group to really perform well, it needs practice. The group needs to understand the best way to organize itself for performance.

This concept is commonly understood by sports teams and the military. They clearly see the need to give groups opportunities to practice. Boot Camp for the military and pre-season workouts for sports teams are the norm.

It’s interesting to note in business that there is far less interest or appreciation of group development and the need for practice. Team practice, for the most part, is not factored into the business or corporate world. We form groups in business and march them into the corporate battle zone expecting them to perform and when they fail we are surprised.

Published in HR Strategy & Tips

There are an estimated 80 million young Americans who belong to the so-called millennial generation, roughly ages 18 to 35. By next year, they are expected to comprise 36% of the U.S. workforce, and by 2020, millennials will be nearly half of all workers.

While millennials are the most educated and culturally diverse of any generation before them, they’re also notorious job-hoppers who dislike bureaucracy and distrust traditional hierarchies—leaving many business leaders scratching their heads. What motivates this rising cohort? How do you keep them engaged, earn their trust and get the most out them? Leadership and millennial experts weighed in with a few surprising—and surprisingly easy—ways to inspire millennial workers.

Published in Workforce Management

Backgroundchecks

Let’s face it. The economy is still a mess and people aren’t finding jobs fast enough.

Given this fact, there are a lot of people looking to place the blame for these developments. And has been the case for the last several years, many are focusing on employment screening and background checks. I won’t say that all who oppose background check are flat out wrong in every instance, but all too frequently they rely on myths, misconceptions and urban legends to support their arguments.

Here is my list of the most commonly held misconceptions about employment background checks:

Published in Employee Screening
Thursday, 01 December 2011

Bad hires in hindsight

Published in Staffing

Reasons for the heightened use of temps, contractors and the like begin with the shaky business climate. Despite growth and profits, companies have been loath to hire full-time and part-time staff in case the economy suddenly tanks again.

Using temporary workers at the start of a recovery is nothing new. But other factors behind the contingent expansion are less tied to the business cycle. These include cost-savings. Although contractor fees can exceed the hourly wage of a regular employee, especially in the United States where employer-provided health care is standard, the total compensation of a regular employee typically exceeds that of contingents.

Published in Staffing
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