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This report is published eight times per year. Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources

This report is published eight times per year. Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources.

Research by ASA corporate partner Monster finds that most small business owners identify hiring the wrong person for a job as a risk to the company. In the survey nearly 700 small business owners in the U.S., 89% of respondents said hiring the wrong person is a risk to the company; 51% said it is a major risk.

None of us can completely check our personality at the door, so we tend to bring our habits, good and bad, into the workplace with us. We can be supplicative, combative, competitive, or cooperative.

Using the wrong word in a, memo or proposal can be embarrassing. Discover the 50 most misused words in business writing and avoid a damaging faux pas in the future.

Commonly known as the Beige Book, this report is published eight times per year. Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources.

Commonly known as the Beige Book. Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources.

Commonly known as the Beige Book, this report is published eight times per year. Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources.

Have you heard the saying, “A comfort zone is a beautiful place, but nothing ever grows there”? It can be difficult to shake the anxiety that often goes with doing things we’re not used to or comfortable with, precisely because we have either little or poor experience with whatever is outside our comfort zone.


The U.S. Department of the Treasury and the U.S. Internal Revenue Service released final instructions and tax forms for the Affordable Care Act’s information reporting requirements. These requirements apply to employers and health insurers as set out in Internal Revenue Code sections 6055 (Forms 1094-B and 1095-B) and 6056 (Forms 1094-C and 1095-C). The agencies also released final transmission forms that will be used to submit the information to the IRS. The final forms and instructions are largely consistent with draft forms and instructions released last summer. Employers that file at least 250 forms annually are required to file electronically. Instructions for electronic filing of the information remain under development.

Sometimes truly brilliant things are hidden in plain sight.

It just may be the crime of the century. Our minds, thoughts and chief productivity tool--attention--are being stolen by a thief operating with absolute impunity: incessant, unbounded interruptions. An ever-growing volume of intruders--e-mail, texts, apps, phone calls, social media alerts--combined with assaults from increasingly time-panicked humans, are leaving few places safe.

Emails are more important than you might think. When applying for jobs, they can be just as important as an impressive resume and well-written cover letter, especially when you’re only corresponding electronically. According to today’s infographic, the majority of daily email comes from business correspondence. So, think about that the next time you include a smiley emoji at the end of a sentence.